Archive | February, 2014

Simple Stress Busters Natural Ways to Slide into a State of Calmness by Kathleen Barnes

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

We all encounter everyday stressors and usually find our own ways of defusing them. However, when chronic stress remains unresolved, it extracts a toll on health that may range from heart disease and stroke to obesity, gastrointestinal problems and depression. Thankfully, Natural Awakenings has uncovered inviting ways to regularly de-stress that naturally make us feel good. Here are some refreshing ideas for immediate rest and relaxation.

Eat Mindfully: Chocolate can be an excellent antidote to stress-related binge eating, advises Dr. Susan Lord, an integrative physician in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, who leads mind-body medicine programs at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, in Stockbridge. “We rarely eat mindfully,” comments Lord. “We’re usually gulping down our food while watching TV, arguing with the kids or reading a book.”

She often leads a meditation in which participants are allotted one small piece of chocolate that they must eat slowly and consciously. “Most people discover they have never really tasted their food,” she says. “They are pleasantly surprised to discover that they feel satiated and satisfied on every level.”

Lord’s teaching is supported by a study from an Oregon Research Institute affiliate in Albuquerque, New Mexico, showing that people lost significant amounts of weight by eating slowly and mindfully. Accordingly, Kripalu has encouraged eating in silence for nearly 40 years, a practice Lord heartily recommends to her patients for one meal a day.

Walk a labyrinth. A meditative walk on a labyrinth may be just what the doctor ordered, says physician Esther Sternberg, professor of medicine and research director at the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona, in Tucson. “A labyrinth differs from a maze, which has high walls and many dead ends,” notes Sternberg. “Walking a maze is inevitably stressful; a labyrinth has the exact opposite effect. There is only one path in and one path out. You go to the middle, meditate and walk back out. It’s a perfectly calming walking meditation.”

In physiological terms, Sternberg explains, the deep breathing induced by labyrinth walking activates the vagus nerve, which prompts relaxation. It does this by interrupting the brain’s stress response and halting the release of adrenaline and the stress hormone cortisol from the adrenal glands.

Our ancestors built labyrinths as early as 4,000 B.C. They exist today in churches, healing centers and backyards all over the world. Finger labyrinths, even as simple as a labyrinthine outline printed on a piece of paper, also have proved to be effective relaxation tools, says Neal Harris, a licensed clinical professional counselor in Barrington, Illinois. His study confirming its relaxing effects was published in the Annals of Psychotherapy & Integrative Health.

Shake (or laugh) it off. Anyone that has ever felt like exploding from tight shoulders, indigestion, headaches or other conditions caused by accumulated stress can benefit from Lord’s recommendation to experience a whole-body shake.

“Just stand with your feet firmly planted and start shaking—first your feet, then your legs, arms, head and neck and eventually, your whole body—for at least two or three minutes,” she counsels. “You’ll shake off all of that tension, energize every cell and probably start laughing, another great stress reliever.”

A good belly laugh is likewise a powerful stress reliever, according to a study by researchers at Indiana State University, in Terra Haute, published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. Results also showed that laughter increased production of the protective cells that boost immune function.

Create a memory garden. For Sternberg, her personal place of peace is an unconscious re-creation combining the sights and smells of her grandmother’s garden with the comfortable “at home” feeling of her parents’ deck and mementos from a happy time in Crete. At the center of Sternberg’s happy memories are fragrant jasmine and gardenia trees, lavender and basil, all reminders of happy times in her life. She recalls, “It wasn’t until I was finished that I realized what I had done.”

A review of relevant science reported in Neural Plasticity explains that the brain’s hippocampus region, a seat of memory, especially related to place, also normally regulates the production of cortisol. But an excess of cortisol due to stress can impair its memory functions. “When we are in a place that brings happy memories to mind, we let go of stress and so stop the release of cortisol,” says Sternberg. “It helps to just think of a place where we have been happy.”

She recommends creating a home space with some plants on a windowsill, photos of happy family gatherings, fabrics or paint in beloved colors and perhaps inherited items that trigger fond memories.

Kathleen Barnes is author of numerous natural health books, including 10 Best Ways to Manage Stress. Connect at KathleenBarnes.com.

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Rethinking Heart Health Pioneering Doctors and Patients Reinvent Cardio Care by Linda Sechrist

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

In 1977, Dr. Dean Ornish began to think beyond an allopathic medicine paradigm that defined the reversal of cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD) and the hypertensive diseases such as heart failure and stroke, as physiologically implausible. Undaunted by the challenge of funding his research, he pushed forward. Results of his foundational 1986 to 1992 Lifestyle Heart Trial, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, proved that individuals with preexisting coronary atherosclerosis that make intensive, integrated lifestyle changes can begin to experience improvements in their condition after as little as one year without using lipid-lowering drugs.

Based on his 35 years of clinical research, Ornish and his colleagues further showed that five years of following proper nutrition, fitness and stress management—which must include love and support—can reduce symptoms of CHD and other chronic conditions. He remarks in Love & Survival: 8 Pathways to Intimacy and Health that despite numerous studies showing a medical basis for its occurrence, the reason why CHD is reversible is still the subject of debate.

Ornish’s work has paved the way for a growing corps of pioneering integrative physicians successfully collaborating with patients to reduce the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.

Plaque the Culprit

The cause of cardiovascular disease is arterial plaque, a fine layer of fatty material that forms within the arteries and blocks blood flow. It is largely the result of food and activity choices plus the degree of inflammation in the arteries. Dr. Steven Masley’s three keys to improving heart health highlighted in his book, The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up, and an upcoming PBS special, concern lifestyle factors capable of shrinking plaque, improving circulation and strengthening the heartbeat. “Abnormal plaque growth is preventable 90 percent of the time,” states the president of Masley Optimal Health Center, in St. Petersburg, Florida.

While conducting research on the heart health of nearly 1,000 patients over a period of 20 years, Masley suspected that the traditional assessment approach of measuring cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure didn’t effectively address the biochemistry within arteries. Testing intima-medial thickness (IMT) using a simple 10-minute external ultrasound confirmed it. The test bounces high-frequency sound waves to measure the thickness of the innermost two layers in carotid arteries on either side of the neck.

“This valuable tool allows for an estimate of arterial age. A healthy, young cardiovascular system has less plaque and an unhealthy, old one has more,” advises Masley. IMT, a useful tool for preventing future heart attacks and strokes, differs from standard carotid Doppler ultrasound, which looks for artery obstructions suggesting surgery.

A practitioner of functional medicine, Masley explains heart-related diagnoses differently from his allopathic counterparts. “Rather than diagnosing high blood pressure as hypertension, I categorize it as not enough exercise, not enough fruits and vegetables, high emotional stress and excessive body fat.”

To optimize heart health, Masley employs a broad, holistic matrix of options that enhance the cardiovascular system—the interactions among diet, activity level, weight, environmental toxins, hormones, stress and biochemical factors such as blood sugar control and inflammation levels. He prescribes: heart-healing foods that simultaneously help to manage the aging process; following a customized, heart-friendly supplement plan; engaging in exercise that strengthens the heart and arteries; and learning how to better manage stress.

He contends cardiovascular events remain the top cause of death because individuals are largely unaware of treatment options before they get into trouble. More, “Most people falsely assume that their condition has been fixed with a medical procedure and/or drugs, and that a lifestyle change isn’t necessary.”

Cholesterol’s Bad Rap

Dr. Stephen Sinatra, an integrative cardiologist, anti-aging specialist and bioenergetics psychotherapist, in Manchester, Connecticut has also shifted his heart health paradigm. He now prescribes a combination of conventional medicine, food, supplements, mind/body strategies and natural healing methods. His book, Heartbreak and Heart Disease: A Mind/Body Prescription for Healing the Heart, relays many inspiring case histories that address the psycho-emotional component of heart health and illustrate how to repair and reopen a broken heart by releasing long-repressed emotions.

Following two years of Gestalt psychotherapy training and seven years of bioenergetics training, Sinatra likewise realized that heartbreak was one of the major causes of heart disease. An expert in the field of natural cardiology, he had once believed that cholesterol and fat were the primary causes before 40 years of treatment research taught him otherwise.

“Cholesterol is not the reason for heart disease,” advises Sinatra, founder of HeartMDInstitute.com and author of The Great Cholesterol Myth. “The body produces and needs cholesterol to convert sunlight to vitamin D, to make sex hormones, vital semipermeable membranes for the body’s trillions of cells, plus bile salts for digestion. Even your brain makes and uses cholesterol to build connections between the neurons that facilitate learning and memory.”

Real Perpetrators

Sinatra names the real perpetrators of heart disease—stress, inflammation and overeating sugar and processed foods containing saturated fat. He counsels that the heart benefits less from a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet than one low in carbohydrates and higher in healthy fats, overturning widespread medical mantras.

Also, a high-fructose, high-grain carbohydrate diet raises triglycerides, increases the risk of metabolic syndrome and contributes to insulin resistance, causing the liver to produce more cholesterol as well as more inflammatory low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) particles, all of which increase the risk for CHD, diabetes and stroke. The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that metabolic syndrome, which affects nearly 35 percent of American adults, may overtake smoking as the leading risk factor for CHD.

The AHA currently is focused on increasing awareness that heart disease is the number one killer of women. Its Go Red for Women campaign emphasizes the vital need to take preventive basic actions, including adopting an exercise routine, healthier diet and doctor visits for appropriate non-invasive tests.

Essential Spirit

Dr. James Forleo, a chiropractor in Durango, Colorado, with 30-plus years of clinical experience maintains that health is simple, disease is complicated (also the title of his book). He counsels patients, “If mental stress is present in your life, you owe it to your cardiovascular system to change to a healthier lifestyle. Your life may depend on it.”

Forleo has recognized that an individual’s state of mind can be a big help or hindrance in maintaining a healthy heart. “The heart represents a different realm of experience entirely, one that cannot be explained by logic and reason,” comments Forleo.

He champions the link between maintaining normal spinal function and healthy heart function, along with supporting the inner presence of Spirit, which he calls the healthy heart’s ultimate elixir. “Its essence relaxes the heart, opens the mind to possibilities greater than itself and provides the perspective that the heart and the mind are complementary,” he observes.

He explains that when our emotions get bottled up, something in our heart or circulation has to give. “If you or someone you know experiences heart problems, chances are that unresolved emotions lie directly below the surface,” he says. “There are exceptions, and genetic problems can explain many heart defects, but heart problems don’t usually show up unless emotions are involved.”

Forleo’s concept is supported by the work of Rollin McCraty, Ph.D., executive vice president and director of research at California’s Institute of HeartMath. His research papers include The Energetic Heart: Bioelectromagnetic Interactions Within and Between People.

“Today, evidence suggests that the heart may play a particularly important role in emotional experience. Research in the relatively new discipline of neurocardiology has confirmed that it’s a sensory organ and acts as a sophisticated information encoding and processing center that learns, remembers and makes independent functional decisions that don’t involve the cerebral cortex,” advises McCraty.

To Happy Hearts

Pioneering integrative medical doctors Masley, Sinatra, Forleo and Mona Lisa Schultz, who also holds a Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience, agree that in matters of heart disease, emotions take center stage. Schultz, who recently co-authored All is Well: Heal Your Body with Medicine, Affirmations and Intuition, with Louise L. Hay, a leading founder of the self-help movement, applies her 25 years of experience as a medical intuitive with the best of Western clinical science, brain research and energy medicine.

Shultz observes, “Every illness has an emotional component, which tells us intuitively that something or someone in our life or environment is out of balance and needs to be addressed. Our use of language—such as frustration makes our heart race, anger boils our blood—and our common sense are telling us what we don’t need more studies to confirm. If we can’t deal with our anger in a timely fashion, name our feelings, respond effectively and release them, we increase our chance of illness, ranging from hypertension to cardiovascular events.”

According to the American Journal of Cardiology, the U.S. spends 10 percent of all healthcare dollars for cardiovascular disease prevention and medical management versus 90 percent on medical treatment procedures and hospital care. For individuals interested in taking charge of their heart health, working with a physician that embraces the emerging paradigm of integrative lifestyle changes and prevention can be a drug-free, life-saving decision.

Linda Sechrist is the senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings. Visit ItsAllAboutWe.com for full interviews.

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Cardiac Care for Pets How to Keep Little Hearts Humming by Dr. Shawn Messonnier

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

Symptoms that suggest a dog or cat’s heart is not pumping effectively include coughing and an inability to tolerate exercise. Before it shows in outward signs, it is far better to check for heart disease during regular twice-yearly visits to the veterinarian. Using a stethoscope, a skilled doctor can pick up telltale heart murmurs during the examination.

A fairly common problem with cats, heart disease tends to occur as cardiomyopathy, an issue with the heart muscle. In most dogs, where cardiomyopathy is rare, it usually involves damaged heart valves, resulting in “leaks” that allow blood to flow in both directions.

Upon an initial diagnosis of heart disease, one of two mistakes in treatment routinely occur: Either a doctor prescribes strong cardiac medications to “prevent” heart failure from happening (even though no medication has been shown to prevent heart failure), or he takes a wait-and-see approach, only intervening when the disease progresses to irreversible heart failure.

The better approach is to do further testing and evaluation at the first sign of a murmur, including chest X-rays, an electrocardiogram (EKG) and a cardiac ultrasound to classify the stage of the disease and determine if conventional medications can help. Follow-up visits every six months allow the doctor to identify the point at which heart disease has progressed toward impending heart failure.

In general, pets with a diseased heart disease or failing heart can both benefit from supplements. Individual regimens vary, based on the nature of the patient’s case.

Omega-3

Fish oil contains beneficial docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) unsaturated omega-3 fatty acids. The principle metabolites derived from the metabolism of EPA and DHA tend to be anti-inflammatory.

Contrariwise, omega-6 fatty acids, which are found in warm-weather vegetable oils, produce pro-inflammatory mediators. Because omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids compete with each other to be converted to active metabolites (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory) in the body, decreasing the intake of omega-6 fatty acids and/or increasing dietary omega-3 fatty acid levels, available through fish oil, is generally considered beneficial. The differing numbers identifying omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids simply refer to where the carbon-carbon double bonds are positioned in the molecules.

Supplementing with fish oil may also reduce the occurrence of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, heart failure and sudden cardiac death by decreasing inflammation throughout the body, including in the heart.

Coenzyme Q-10

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinol or ubiquinone, is a naturally occurring antioxidant synthesized in most tissues in the body. The highest concentrations are in the heart, kidneys, liver and pancreas. In the diet, CoQ10 is found in foods such as organ meats, poultry, fish, meat, nuts, soybean oil, fruits, vegetables, eggs and dairy products.

The Professional’s Handbook of Complementary & Alternative Medicines explains that CoQ10 is used in electron transport in mitochondria—small organelles inside cells that convert carbohydrates and fats into energy. It reports that studies in people with hypertension showed a reduction in systolic blood pressure through CoQ10 supplementation. Benefits of such therapy studied in people with a heart that has failed in its pumping ability showed increased heart-pumping ability and proper dilation of the blood vessels for improved circulation. It is proving to be one of the best nutrients to help an ailing heart.

Hawthorn

The herb hawthorn is highly regarded for its suitability in the treatment of heart disease due to its flavonoid and other antioxidant content. It provides several beneficial effects for the heart—helping to maintain a normal heart rhythm with decreased risk of arrhythmias, positive effects on the force of heart muscle contraction, increased coronary blood flow and decreased energy demand by the organ. It acts like angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as the medicine Enalapril, used to help regulate blood pressure and reduce the workload of a failing heart.

While other therapies can be used to help pet heart patients, these three are a sound starting point. In some cases, they may be suitable instead of medications that can cause side effects to the kidney and liver, or at least allow for smaller doses. Natural remedies provide a gentler alternative.

Shawn Messonnier, a doctor of veterinary medicine practicing in Plano, TX, is the award-winning author of The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats and Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets. For more information, visit PetCareNaturally.com.

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Chocolate as Health Food : A Rich Diet- and Heart-Booster by Judith Fertig

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

“Research tells us that 14 out of any 10 individuals like chocolate,” quips cartoonist Sandra Boynton. American chocolate lovers buy 58 million-plus pounds around Valentine’s Day, according to Nielsen Research. Ideally, the dark treat would be as healthy as a salad or an apple. Fortunately, accumulating research is on the way to giving plant-based chocolate superfood status.

All chocolate starts with cacao beans, seeds from the pods of the tropical cacao tree that thrives only in hot, rainy climates in Africa, Indonesia and South America. Local soil and climate conditions determine flavor characteristics, much as with grapes. Harvested beans are fermented to create the chocolate taste and then dried. Afterwards, chocolate makers add brand-specific ingredients to the cacao solids.

“The percentage number on a bar’s wrapper represents the weight that actually comes from the cacao bean content,” says Robert L. Wolke, professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and author of What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained. “The higher the number, the lower the percentage of sugar and the less sweet, more bitter and complex the flavor.”

This is significant because dark chocolate contains higher levels of antioxidants which can help reduce cell damage, according to the Integrative Medicine Department at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

Alex Whitmore, founder of Taza Chocolate, in Somerville, Massachusetts, recently had one of its bars lab-tested for antioxidant levels. The standard measure of antioxidants in food is called ORAC, or oxygen radical absorption capacity; the higher the value, the more antioxidants. Taza Chocolate’s 80% Dark Bar had a 65 percent higher ORAC than Himalayan goji berries, famed for being a ‘superfood’. “This is very high for a chocolate bar,” says Whitmore.

Cocoa also serves as a superfood for cardiovascular and metabolic health, report two recent studies from separate teams of Harvard School of Public Health researchers. A 2012 meta-analysis of clinical trials published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that consuming dark, unsweetened cocoa powder and dark chocolate can improve blood pressure, vascular dilation and cholesterol levels, plus reduce metabolic precursors like diabetes that can lead to heart disease.

In 2011, Eric Ding, Ph.D., a Harvard School of Public Health epidemiologist and nutrition scientist, reviewed short-term trials of subjects ingesting 400 to 500 mg per day of flavonoid-rich cocoa, which he equates to 33 bars of milk chocolate or eight bars of dark chocolate. While Ding feels this is an unreasonable amount to eat because of the extra calories from sugar and fat, he states, “Supplements with concentrated cocoa flavonoids may perhaps be helpful for garnering the benefits discovered. The key is getting the benefits for heart disease while avoiding the calories, and for that, chocolate bars are not likely the best solution.”

Another observational study published in Nutrition shows that eating dark chocolate might help keep the pounds off for teenagers. Researchers with the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) program at the University of Zaragoza, in Spain, knew that chocolate consumption in adults already had been linked to lower body mass index (BMI). They found that chocolate consumption was also associated with lower total and midsection fat in European adolescents, reports Sayer Ji, founder of GreenMedInfo.com, a natural health research database.

“The quality and cocoa content they used in their research is probably much higher than in America,” says Ji. “From my perspective, it appears that even when researchers don’t control for type, the results across the board are rather startling. Even American subjects, presumably eating common milk chocolate bars, see benefits.”

So, this Valentine’s Day—and every day—we can happily relish that one-ounce piece of artisan dark chocolate melting slowly in our mouth and know we’re doing it for pleasure and for health.

Judith Fertig blogs at AlfrescoFoodAndLifestyle.blogspot.com from Overland Park, KS.

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Same Doctor, Different Space

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

The new year brings a lot of excitement and change for Erika Siegel, ND, LAc as she enjoys her 10th year practicing holistic primary care medicine. Dr. Siegel has moved nine blocks down the road to Bambu Clinic where she joins forces with Rebecca Asmar, ND and Beth Griffing, LAc in providing excellent health care for the community.
Dr. Siegel will continue to practice the same days and hours as well as offer the same services, including in-network insurance providers. However, she does have a few great additions to offer—infrared therapy, a full herbal tincture medicinary, an extremely comfortable treatment table and validated parking.
Offering adjunct or primary care for all ages over one year old, current and new patients are welcome to call the clinic at 503-274-9360 to schedule an appointment. Her new email address is DrSiegel@BambuClinic.com. Learn more about Dr. Siegel’s special interests on the Bambu Clinic website.
Location: 838 SW 1st Ave., Ste. 330, Portland. For more information, visit BambuClinic.com

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Inner Guidance—Fact or Fiction

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

Do you wonder whether your own inner guidance is real? Do you wonder how to truly tune in to better listen to that sometimes, subtle inner voice?
Expert on the topic, Anne Archer Butcher, will be visiting Portland to share astounding stories from her new book Inner Guidance: Our Divine Birthright, published by Eckankar. Butcher is an award-winning producer and writer, mother and wife, businesswoman and member of the Eckankar clergy who speaks at international gatherings.
“Inner guidance,” says Butcher, “is an exceptional spiritual tool. It opens the door of the heart to divine assistance, like having the wisest person in the world at our shoulder, helping with every decision. Who wouldn’t want that?” The stories in this book are from Butcher’s own personal exploration of inner guidance. Butcher adds, “I offer them in the hope they will show you the way to your own stories, your own realizations of this wealth of guidance and direction in your life. It’s waiting for you to discover and cultivate for your own greatest good on every level—spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical.”
Local appearances will be at New Renaissance Bookshop for a workshop and book signing from 7 to 8:30 p.m., March 5; at the Eckankar Oregon Regional Seminar at Unity Church of Portland (4525 SE Stark) from 7 to 9 p.m., March 7 and from 2 to 9 p.m., March 8; and at Eckankar Center of Portland (7904 SE Milwaukie) for talk, service and hospitality from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., March 9.
For more information, visit Eckankar-Oregon.org or call 800-258-8730.

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Special Valentine’s Day Offer from EcoMaids

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

This Valentine’s Day, give your sweetheart the day off and let EcoMaids do the cleaning.
Surprise your loved one with an EcoMaids Valentine’s Day Gift Package that includes an initial service visit and five regular service visits to clean the kitchen, living room, dining room, entry, hallway, stairs, one bedroom and one bathroom. Book by February 8 and get a second bedroom cleaned for free (cleaning added to initial service visit). All cleaning visits must take place on a weekly or bi-weekly frequency or regular prices will be applied. Additional fees may apply if rooms are added and/or substituted, and homes over 2,500 square feet are subject to an additional charge.
This special Valentine offer, which expires February 28, is limited to one per household, may not be combined with any other offer, discount or promotion, and you must mention this offer at the time of booking. EcoMaids Gift Cards are available in denominations of $50 to $1,000 and can be delivered in a seeded-paper gift card holder, a specialized gift box or as a virtual e-gift card. Save 20 percent by purchasing Six Cleaning Visits for $599.

Call 503-908-0950 or visit Portland.Ecomaids.com.

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North Portland Wellness Center Now Offering Group Acupuncture Sessions

Posted on 02 February 2014 by Jason

In the facilitation of balance in the body, heart and mind acupuncture works best, as you may have heard, with regular treatments. Depending on a number of factors—constitution, lifestyle, self-care habits, seasonal fluctuations—the frequency of need may vary. The ideal treatment protocol for one person may be every other day whereas for another the best support would be a bi-monthly protocol.
In this ever-changing insurance world, the cost of private, one-on-one treatments can make it challenging for patients to get the treatment they need. By offering acupuncture in a group setting, North Portland Wellness Center (NPWC) can offer lower rates while still providing high-quality, personalized care to their patients. NPWC’s group treatment space has four very comfortable reclining chairs and a massage chair for Asian bodywork on Wednesdays. The space allows for one-on-one attention at the beginning of a patient’s session and relaxation time alongside others during needle retention time.
The shared space component of group treatments can be an enriching experience either among others you don’t know personally or alongside family or friends. The group healing experience facilitates an environment that can enhance the power of each individual’s treatment.
You can schedule an appointment in advance (recommended) or drop in at the scheduled group treatment times during the week. Group sessions are currently offered on Wednesday from 2 to 7 p.m., Thursday and Friday 3 to 7 p.m. and every other Saturday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The introductory cost is $35 per session. No insurance may be billed for these sessions. If you have questions about whether or not the group treatments will be an effective style for you or just want more information, call the North Portland Wellness Center 503-493-9398.

NorthPortlandWellness.com

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