Archive | January, 2015

Don’t Let Bacteria Spoil the Party

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Don’t Let Bacteria Spoil the Party
During the holiday season, we may eat more often from dishes of food that have been sitting out for some time. Mayonnaise in noodles, egg and potato salads and unwashed fruit can deliver sickening doses of numerous bacteria. Turkey and chicken can be a significant source of Salmonella. Even lettuce and spinach in salads can harbor E. coli. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that 50 million Americans each year get sick from foodborne illnesses. As many as 3,000 people will die. With 50 million reported cases a year, how is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration going to protect us from home-cooked meals?
There is something that we can do to protect ourselves. Laboratory testing and clinical studies have shown that a strongly enhanced, aqueous silver colloid will kill E. coli, salmonella, staph and other food-borne bacteria. Drinking one ounce, waiting 30 minutes and drinking another ounce can stop even the most severe occurrence of food poisoning without antibiotics. This technique has been shown to be so effective against Salmonella typhi that it was recently delivered for humanitarian aid to health clinics in Haiti.
We can enjoy dining and protect our families from food poisoning this holiday season and throughout the new year. Just have enhanced aqueous silver colloid on hand to administer the antidote at the first sign of stomach pain or belly ache.
For more information, call 888-465-4404 or visit NaturesRiteRemedies.com.

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Clearing & Protecting Our Sacred Space

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Clearing & Protecting Our Sacred Space
For anyone who has been feeling bogged down, drained energetically, depressed or feeling any sense of oppression, then having an Angelic Auric Clearing will be very empowering and a greatly beneficial experience that will clear out any past debris from throughout one’s lifetime.
Claiming back our sacred space and aligning fully with the Living Light will create great shifts at an energetic level—creating powerful shifts on a physical, mental and emotional level. The end result is living in alignment with our highest self, our God Self, living fully in the light and allowing the Essence and life force to fully flow through us while supporting us on every level. This is a full release from our conditioned behavior of living in fear, shame, guilt and worry…a letting go of the egoic self and all limiting belief systems no longer serving us.
The angels and Tawnya Love work as a powerful team, along with many ascended masters and spirit guides. During an energy clearing, a person may feel amazing energy within the mind and body as the angels assist in raising the vibration to a higher dimension. One will feel a deep sense of peace and calm, as the angels clear away all fear and emotional cords attached to others that are no longer serving one’s highest well being.
For more information and to schedule a one-on-one Angelic Auric Clearing, contact Intuitive Angelic Healer Tawnya Love at 360-567-7576 or email TawnyaAngel@gmail.com

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Ruiz to Speak on New Book Tour

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Ruiz to Speak on New Book Tour
Don Jose Ruiz, New York Times bestselling author of The Fifth Agreement: A Practical Guide to Self-Mastery and Ripples of Wisdom, is combining an upcoming U.S. speaking tour with book signings of his latest work, My Good Friend the Rattlesnake: Stories of Loss, Truth, and Transformation. The event is designed to lead participants in an evening of their own self-discovery as he shares personal anecdotes and lessons learned through translating ancient Toltec wisdom into practical concepts that promote daily transformation through truth, love and common sense.
Ruiz’ message intends to empower individuals to live in truth and move beyond doubt and to let go of the lies that create emotional drama, victimization and the limiting belief systems our “domestication” has programmed into us. Other themes he shares are becoming aware of confusion between “who you are” and “what you know” and how agreements have created our reality; letting go of fear of what we are without our beliefs; making new agreements that are more in line with our authentic self and attaining a happier and more rewarding life.

For local tour information and to purchase tickets, call 619-565-5653, email Karla@MiguelRuiz.com or visit MiguelRuiz.com.

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Win a Free Forecast Reading for 2015

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Win a Free Forecast Reading for 2015
What do the stars have in store for you in 2015? Enter to win a FREE astrological reading with longtime astrologer Liz Howell, founder of Celestial Living Arts.
According to Howell, much of our success in 2015 will come as a result of scrutinizing the patterns of our thinking that allow for expansion when needed and contraction where necessary. We are sowing the seeds in the year ahead with the longer range intention of right-sizing our expectations so we can realize our dreams as we sharpen and define the purpose of our lives.
Find out what part of your natal chart is being highlighted and how and where you can begin to change the outer realities of your life through the internal review of your personal belief systems and structures.

Enter to win by sending an email to Liz@CelestialLivingArts.com with 2015 Astrology Reading in the subject line. Please include one sentence indicating your #1 goal for 2015. All entries must be received by Jan. 31. The winner will be notified the first week of February.

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Loving Kindness Hypnosis January Specials

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Loving Kindness Hypnosis January Specials
Laney Coulter of Loving Kindness Hypnosis is offering 20 percent off their most popular and successful hypnotherapy programs during the month of January.
Change your relationship with food forever in the Weight Mastery Program. Learn how to stop using food to distract you from your feelings by learning a successful method to help you determine when you are feeling real hunger, not pseudo hunger or any other feeling that needs attention rather than food. Work will be done on the core issue(s) while you are learning Intentional Eating. A 10-session package (can take up to 3 months) is $999.
Become a Non-Smoker Now. People who have been smoking for less than 15 years can become a non-smoker in two sessions, and those who have been smoking for more than 15 years can become a non-smoker in five sessions. A 2-session package is $199; a 5 session package is $499.
Or try the Reduce/Eliminate Stress, Anger, Fear, Guilt 6-session program for $599.
Coulter will lead you back to loving kindness toward yourself and others.

To make an appointment, contact Laney Coulter, BCH, NLP at 503-289-3614 or .Laney@LovingKindnessHypnosis.com VISA/MasterCard accepted. Payment plans available.

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Pet Anesthesia How to Make It Safe and Easier on Everyone by Shawn Messonnier

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Many pet parents and some veterinarians have an unnecessary fear of animal anesthesia. Addressing some misconceptions about this common medical procedure can be helpful, particularly in regard to older pets.

Myth #1: Anesthesia is Dangerous

Modern anesthesia has evolved into a safe medical practice since it was introduced in 1799 and uses much safer drugs than earlier versions. Still, all medications need to be approached cautiously for the welfare of all individuals connected to its use. Both injectable anesthetic drugs and inhalant anesthetic drugs (gases) can be used safely if properly chosen for a specific condition, accurately dosed and continuously monitored.

Myth #2: Grogginess is a Given

When a high-quality medication is properly administered, a groggy state lasting from several hours to a day or more following a procedure shouldn’t occur. Lower-quality anesthetic drugs injected during discounted spaying and neutering procedures may produce such prolonged recovery periods.

It’s safer to use a high quality quick-acting short-term injectable anesthetic, followed by gas anesthesia for anesthetic maintenance, during surgical procedures, including for spaying and neutering. Patients wake up quickly following surgery and can be sent home fully awake soon afterwards.

Myth #3: A Pet is Too Old

No pet is too old for proper medical care. Because older pets don’t metabolize some drugs as well as younger ones, the correct anesthesia must be chosen for the pet’s age and current state of health or medical problems. Too often, pets haven’t received proper care, especially dental cleanings and tumor removals, because their current veterinarian has deemed them too old for anesthesia.

Both the family and the veterinarian need to feel comfortable with treatments. Ask questions before submitting an animal to any anesthetic, surgical or medical procedure. Talk with the veterinarian about using this gentle, natural approach to help relieve any concerns if a pet needs sedation or anesthesia.

Shawn Messonnier, a doctor of veterinary medicine practicing in Plano, TX, is the award-winning author of The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats and Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets. For more information, visit PetCareNaturally.com.

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Eco-Friendly Floors Sustainable Beauty Underfoot by Avery Mack

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Truly good flooring is beautiful, practical and eco-friendly. The best choices may change from room-to-room, as well as with geography, depending on family needs. Here are some key factors to consider for an optimum installation.

Added Value—Hardwood

Wood comes in many colors, polished to a high gloss or textured, and can be refinished when styles change. “Timber used to float downriver to the sawmill and not all of it arrived. We salvage logs from the bottom of the Penobscot River for flooring and other products,” says Tom Shafer, co-owner of Maine Heritage Timber, in Millinocket. “Our wood is as fresh as the day it was cut decades ago.” Cold water preserves the resource and adds a natural patina. Removal of the estimated 700,000 cords of underwater wood will help restore the waterway’s natural eco-system.

Note: Wood can scratch or dent and be susceptible to water damage. Even recycled wood might not be eco-friendly. “Wood reclaimed from manufacturing plants can contain machine oils, harsh chemical residue, lead paint or asbestos,” explains Shafer. “Know where it came from; follow the chain of evidence.”

High Traffic, Pets, Long Life—Linoleum

Linoleum is made from linseed oil, wood powder, resins and ground limestone. Mineral pigments provide rich color throughout, which prevents paler worn spots. A personalized pattern may include borders using linoleum sheets or tiles. It’s long-lasting, durable, fire-resistant, biodegradable, has no harmful volatile organic compounds (VOC) and repels dirt and dust.

Note: Vinyl, made from unnatural chlorinated petrochemicals, won’t wear as well or last as long as linoleum.

Spills or Wet Feet—Tile

Bottles recycled into glass tile reflect light, brightening smaller rooms like the bath. Long-lasting ceramic or porcelain tile has no VOCs, is easy to clean and won’t host germs, bacteria or dust mites.

Note: Look for lead-free glazed tile. Glass tile may be cost-prohibitive for larger spaces. Most tile can be slick when wet; texturing increases safety.

Child- Pet- and Elder-Friendly, Warm and Comfy—Cork

Cork is lightweight, flexible and can mimic stone, granite, tile, marble and wood, while providing comfortable cushioning. “Cork assumes the ambient temperature in the room, keeping feet warmer. It holds up to dogs, too,” says Tim Tompkins, a Portuguese Cork Association committee member in Greenville, South Carolina. “Cork is both healthy for the consumer and sustainable for the environment.”

Note: Due to its cushioning nature, heavy furniture or high-heeled shoes may make indentations.

Wood-like and Sturdy—Bamboo

Bamboo generally regrows in three to five years, is twice as hard as red oak and can be stained almost any color. Edge-grained bamboo, banded together, turns flooring into a statement.

Note: “It’s shipped from Asia and may have formaldehyde glues and durability problems, so shop carefully,” advises David Bergman, a New York City green architect and author of Sustainable Design: A Critical Guide.

Long-Wearing Classic Look—Stone

Travertine, limestone, granite, slate and marble are all stone flooring options. Stone can increase home value, has a classic look and is a piece of history that adds to any décor, although it’s not a renewable resource. Cork or non-petroleum-based laminate floors can give the look of stone without destroying an in-situ natural resource.

Note: Large blocks of stone are cut at quarries and transported to processing plants, cut into slabs and transported to a processor to be cut again, shaped and polished before being shipped to the store—a big carbon footprint.

The Great Imitator—Concrete

Easy-to-clean, durable, concrete never needs to be replaced. Small repairs can be patched. Large repairs, such as a broken pipe beneath the surface, may require refinishing the entire floor to match the stain color. Some homeowners have created a faux rug using other stain colors to disguise the repaired area. Finishes can make concrete look like hardwood, painted tile, a rug, marble or granite, including terrazzo options. For an entryway, homeowners can design a custom welcome mat, perhaps incorporating a family crest, monogram or motto. Finishes can be textured to varying degrees to increase foot traction.

Note: Ensure the structure is sturdy enough to bear the extra weight of concrete. It feels cold underfoot in winter and cool in summer. Epoxy coatings don’t let concrete breathe, so any moisture emanating from the concrete slab will be trapped. Test for the moisture-vapor emission rate; problem areas can include sections covered by furniture.

Avery Mack is a freelance writer in St. Louis, MO. Connect via AveryMack@mindspring.com.

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It’s All About Metabolism Getting to the Root Cause of Disease by Linda Sechrist

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Attempts to tender lay explanations of how to attain and maintain better health have become fragmented and compartmentalized, with complex scientific cause-and-effect explanations of disease regularly reduced to isolated infographics and sound bites in the media. But understanding our body’s sophisticated, self-regulating, self-correcting and interdependent physiological systems, which work in collaboration with each other and inform us of the body’s status by means of symptoms, deserves a whole-systems frame of reference.

Stepping back from immediate concerns to grasp the bigger picture allows for rethinking the Western approach to health. A perspective that connects all the dots works best, beginning with the foundation of wellness—the functioning of 73 trillion cells that are organized into a variety of tissues, including interconnected systems of organs. Optimally, they function together harmoniously to achieve homeostasis, the overall chemical and energetic balance that defines metabolic health.

The Reign of Metabolism

Many perceive the role of metabolism as limited to determining energy expenditure via the number of calories burned per day, but it does much more. Metabolism actually encompasses thousands of physical and chemical processes that take place in the functioning of every cell, the building blocks of life; healthy cell function produces proper endocrine (hormonal) functioning influencing homeostasis.

This past August, 12 nationally recognized functional medicine experts participated in the country’s first online Metabolic Revolution Summit to discuss the importance of recognizing the dots that connect the majority of today’s chronic diseases—high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, pre-diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, weight gain, obesity, fatty liver disease, Alzheimer’s, dementia, some cancers and even infertility. All of the panelists pointed to the root cause that links them all—a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet and sedentary lifestyle.

When several complex conditions exist simultaneously, medical science refers to them as a syndrome. Regardless of how such intricate interrelationships become manifest, all of these syndromes have early-stage signs that include inflammation, high blood sugar and insulin resistance, which can affect metabolic health.

A Holistic Approach

Doctors that specialize in functional integrative medicine strive to improve the health and well-being of patients by engaging them in their own healing process. One popular approach is practiced by Durango, Colorado, Doctor of Chiropractic James Forleo, author of Health is Simple, Disease is Complicated: A Systems Approach to Vibrant Health. He starts by educating people about the basic functioning of the major body systems involved in their specific health challenges.

“To maintain metabolic health, no one should overlook that the body’s intelligence works 24/7 to solve multiple problems simultaneously, including balancing their metabolism. The more complex are the pattern of symptoms, the more systems are involved. Whether a single or group of symptoms indicate metabolic dysfunction, it means that numerous systems that rely on healthy cells are unable to perform their normal functions,” explains Forleo.

For example, blood sugar issues, excess circulating insulin and buildup of excess glucose stored as fat can lead to metabolic dysfunction. The pancreas, thyroid and gastrointestinal tract—primary glands in the endocrine system that plays a major role in balancing body chemistry by secreting hormones directly into the circulatory system—are negatively impacted. Well-functioning adrenals are necessary to balance blood sugar and one role of the pancreas is to produce insulin.

When five of the eight major organ systems—immune, endocrine, cardiovascular, digestive and endocrine—are impacted by metabolic dysfunction, a more holistic and systemic approach to health can provide a broader understanding of how they interrelate, and why preventive measures can preclude having to later pursue ways reverse serious chronic diseases.

Lifestyle Factors

Functional medicine’s integrative approach to metabolic health is based on proper nutrition and regular exercise. “The inflammatory agents present in much of the food consumed at each meal in the standard American diet—high-glycemic refined carbohydrates, high-fructose corn syrup and other sugars, and hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated fats—are the biggest offenders,” says Forleo, who notes that the body instead needs good fats, such as those obtained from olive and coconut oils.

Factors over which we can exercise some control—physical activity, stress, sleep, diet and circadian rhythms—all play roles in metabolic health. Unfortunately, “We are moving further away from our ancestors’ healthier diet and lifestyle. We’re overfed and undernourished because we’re no longer eating for nutrition, but for entertainment,” remarks Doctor of Chiropractic Brian Mowll, the medical director of Sweet Life Diabetes Health Centers in Pennsylvania and Delaware.

He characterizes metabolic dysfunction as the ultimate problem because it’s the doorway to many other ailments. “A hundred years ago, infectious diseases plagued humanity. Today and in the future, it’ll be metabolic disorders such as obesity, cancer, metabolic syndrome, thyroid disorders and other endocrine problems, diabetes and Type 2 diabetes,” predicts Mowll.

Metabolic Health Education

Dr. Caroline Cederquist, author of The MD Factor Diet: A Physician’s Proven Diet for Metabolism Correction and Healthy Weight Loss, and founder of Cederquist Medical Wellness Center, in Naples, Florida, conducted a one-year study of patients to identify their health issues via blood work analysis. Eighty-nine percent of the men, women and children showed evidence of insulin resistance. This often-overlooked metabolic condition affects how the body processes glucose, a simple sugar and the body’s primary fuel, making gaining weight easy and losing it difficult. Treated with proper diet, lifestyle changes and supplements, plus medication in advanced stages, Cederquist found that metabolic dysfunction is reversible.

She explains that long-term insulin resistance can lead to fatty liver disease, high blood sugar and eventually, diabetes. It also directly affects cholesterol levels and can induce triglycerides, high blood pressure, low HDL (high-density lipoprotein, or “good” cholesterol), increased waist circumference and heart disease. In Cederquist’s young adult patients, metabolic dysfunction was also associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome, a cause of infertility.

Germany’s Dr. Wolf Funfack, a specialist in internal and nutritional medicine and creator of a well-regarded metabolic balancing program, noted that insulin resistance both increases the production of stress hormones and blocks production of the anti-inflammatory hormones that slow the aging process. Funfack’s all-natural, personalized nutrition plan, backed by more than 25 years of scientific study, is designed to bring hormonal balance, optimize health and lead to long-term weight management.

Cardiologist Stephen Sinatra, author of Metabolic Cardiology, goes a step further. He believes that metabolic dysfunction involving cells, hormones and inflammation encompasses the molecular-based essence of all disease. He observes, “Individuals diagnosed with several conditions can leave a doctor’s office with three or four prescriptions, rather than the one solution for reversal and prevention—a healthy lifestyle and non-inflammatory diet to offset and neutralize weight gain, blood pressure elevation and other abnormalities such as high blood sugar.”

Mowll agrees that many conventional healthcare practitioners don’t address the root cause of metabolic disorders or provide lifestyle interventions. “They simply reach for the prescription pad,” he says. This growing problem presents an opportunity to educate the entire populace.

Bestselling Virgin Diet author JJ Virgin, who characterizes the human body as a “chemistry lab,” adopts an easy-to-follow nutritional and fitness approach for metabolic health. She recommends eating the types of healthy fats found in wild fish, raw nuts and seeds, coconut, avocado and olives. Virgin prefers the clean, lean protein of grass-fed beef and wild fish, plus low-glycemic lentils and legumes and plenty of low-glycemic fruits like raspberries, blueberries, pears and grapefruits. Low-glycemic vegetables on her list include green peas, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, onion and eggplant. “When you eat this way, there’s a slow release of sugar, and insulin remains at lower levels,” advises Virgin.

As in any systems theory, the whole must be understood in relationship to the parts, as well as the relevant environment. Experts agree that it’s paramount to take an expanded, systemic approach to metabolic health, rather than fixating on only one or two aspects at a time. Metabolic health—from basic cells to the most sophisticated of organized systems—can only be achieved and sustained when the whole system is healthy.

Linda Sechrist is a senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings and host of the online event posted at MetabolicRevolutionSummit.com, which includes a free audio sample.

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Interval Training Knocks Down Blood Sugar Exercise Bursts Prove Fast and Effective by Lisa Marlene

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Labels may vary, but results are what count. Whether called high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE), interval or burst-style training, recent research proves that this form of exercise improves insulin levels. This is promising news for the estimated 50 million American adults who have abdominal obesity and are on the path toward metabolic dysfunction due to a high-sugar diet that causes spikes and crashes in blood sugar levels and eventually contributes to insulin resistance.

According to a recent study published in the Journal of Obesity, the benefits of doing HIIE at least three times a week for two to six weeks include reduction of abdominal body fat, improved aerobic and anaerobic fitness and lower levels of insulin resistance.

In a separate study, Norwegian researchers examined the impact that different types of exercise programs had on individuals seeking to reverse metabolic dysfunction, an overall chemical imbalance largely attributed to insulin resistance. They concluded that despite producing similar effects on body weight and blood pressure, the aerobic interval training group also showed greater improvement in insulin sensitivity, aerobic capacity and high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol) than those performing continuous moderate exercise. They also exhibited lower blood glucose (sugar) levels.

Another beneficial HIIE characteristic is that it involves markedly fewer exercise repetitions and less training time. JJ Virgin, a fitness and nutrition expert and author of The Virgin Diet, recommends incorporating burst-style and resistance training for fast, lasting fat loss and improving insulin resistance. Best of all, you can do these exercises in minutes a day.

“Burst exercise means working out in short intense bursts of 30 to 60 seconds, coupled with one to two minutes of active recovery time, moving at a lower intensity that allows you to catch your breath and lower your heart rate,” she explains.

Two easy examples of this are sprinting to burst and then walking to recover, and running up stairs to burst, and then walking down them to recover. “This should be repeated for a total of four to eight minutes of high-intensity bursts per session. Overall, this will take 20 to 30 minutes,” says Virgin.

She notes that the increase in stress hormones that occurs during HIIE are counteracted by the simultaneously raised levels of anabolic-building hormones. “Short bursts train the body in how to handle stress and recover. Repeated intense bursts raise lactic acid level, which in turn raises growth hormone production and supports fat burning. The research is clear that the more intense the exercise, the bigger is the metabolic benefit afterward.”

The Skinny on Glycemic Foods

by Kathleen Barnes

Those wanting to reduce carbohydrate intake by eating foods with a low glycemic index based on their impact on blood sugar levels might consider using newer tables that instead measure glycemic load, suggests New York City Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist Susan Weiner.

She explains that the glycemic index only considers how quickly sugars from food are released into the bloodstream. The glycemic load charts a more accurate accounting of the amount of carbohydrates in an actual serving, rather than the 50-gram (1.76-ounce) portion used in calculating a food’s ranking on the glycemic index scale of 1 to 100.

“Glycemic load is a better indicator of how a carbohydrate food will affect blood sugar in realistic portions, especially in combination with other foods, including proteins and fats,” advises Weiner.

Here are a few compelling comparisons:

Food Glycemic Index Glycemic Load

Carrot 35 (low) 2 (low)
Watermelon 72 (high) 4 (low)
Graham crackers 74 (high) 8 (low)
Baguette 95 (very high) 15 (medium)
Potato 98 (very high) 18 (medium high)
Snickers bar 51 (medium) 18 (medium high)
Cornflakes 93 (very high) 23 (high)

For an expanded rating of food items, visit Tinyurl.com/Glycemic-Load-Factor.

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Hormone-Happy Foods The Right Choices Make Our Bodies Hum by Linda Sechrist

Posted on 07 January 2015 by Jason

Our body’s hormones work like an orchestra; when one instrument is out of tune, the entire production struggles to maintain harmony. Each plays a part in influencing the others and determining how well the whole concert works.

Fortunately, our body has masterful conductors, including the endocrine system, which coordinates all of the glands and the hormones they produce. “Players” include the adrenal, hypothalamus, pancreas, pineal, pituitary, reproductive and thyroid/parathyroid glands.

“A healthy endocrine system is essential to making hormones in appropriate amounts throughout our life,” says Theresa Dale, Ph.D., a naturopathic doctor who practices as a traditional naturopath and clinical nutritionist in Oxnard, California, and author of Revitalizing Your Hormones. “For example, when the ovaries shut down after menopause, the adrenal glands continue producing progesterone and other essential hormones.”

Dale, dean and founder of the California College of Natural Medicine, further assures that contrary to assertions from some conventional medicine reports, the body is able to produce necessary hormones throughout our entire life.

Hormones function as chemical messengers that commute through the bloodstream as part of the information superhighway that connects the brain to the DNA managers of the body’s cells. “Hormones communicate with chemicals produced by the brain called neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which greatly influence energy levels, moods and other bodily functions such as moving memories from short- to long-term storage,” explains Dale.

For 20 years, she has seen patients with critical hormonal imbalances respond to her recommended three-month, endocrine-rebuilding diet, comprising three daily meals of steamed, sautéed and raw foods, fish, whole grains, legumes, seeds, nuts, fresh fruits and vegetables, plus two raw vegetable or seed snacks. The regimen strives to balance metabolism, cleanse the body, restore immune function and revitalize the endocrine system.

Kokomo, Indiana resident Sylvia Egel, national education director for Metabolic Balance, a personalized nutrition plan to balance metabolism and hormones, optimize health and increase energy at any age, agrees that hormones can be restored and balanced via proper food selections. “Our lifestyle and dietary choices strongly affect our metabolism and hormonal health, as do stress levels and sleep patterns. Eating at the wrong time, in the wrong place or in the wrong order, and even poor combinations of healthy foods, can be as problematic as eating junk food,” says Egel. She also warns against snacking, emotional eating, eating on the go, skipping breakfast and waiting too long between meals.

Diana Hoppe, author of Healthy Sex Drive, Healthy You, an obstetrician and gynecologist in San Diego, California, who leads clinical trials related to women’s health at the Pacific Coast Research Center, also sees firsthand how what we eat directly affects our hormones. She attests that our bodies need a balance of three macronutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fat. “But for 20 years, we have been advised to decrease fat intake in favor of fat-free options that have been detrimental to us, because we need fat to produce hormones and maintain healthy hormone function. Certain fatty acids and cholesterol serve as building blocks in hormone production and cellular function, especially the reproductive hormones of estrogen and testosterone,” says Hoppe.

Food can be medicine for hormones. One of the most important hormone-balancing fats is coconut oil, which heals skin, increases metabolism and supplies a quick source of energy. Egg yolks are a good source of choline and iodine, essential to the production of healthy thyroid hormones, plus are rich in vitamins A, D, E and B-complex vitamins. Avocados have lots of healthy fat that helps absorb and utilize nutrients. Nuts and seeds, olive oil and salmon are all rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids that help stabilize hormone levels. Eating the right foods and incorporating healthy fats into meals increases overall energy, reduces hormonal fluctuations and helps us feel more balanced.

Says Dale, “The majority of individuals are surprised to learn that hormone health doesn’t depend on age, but rather on a complex of factors, like the air we breathe, the water we drink, the quality of our diet, good sleep and adequate exercise, plus the relative health of our relationships and emotional life—and that’s just for starters.”

Linda Sechrist is a senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings.

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